Athletics

Strength & Conditioning

Welcome

Welcome to WolfPack Strength and Conditioning! Our mission is to help athletes reach their maximum potential. Our vision is to create fun and engaging training environments where athletes thrive.

We believe the weight room is the catalyst for a winning culture and that the common threads running through successful programs are: positive, uplifting attitudes; the ability to handle adversity; a relentless work ethic; and mental toughness and grit. It is our hope that these traits will begin and be fostered within our strength and conditioning program.

Through our program, students build a spirit of endurance and perseverance with the understanding that hard work is required to achieve great things. We want students to become determined in the process of putting in repeated effort over time, rather than look for a shortcut or quick fix. These are skills and attitudes that not only contribute to strength as an athlete, but also contribute to strength as a student, Christian, and community member.

The goals of our athletes vary greatly. Some want to earn varsity positions, while others have dreams of playing professionally. It is our desire to help all our athlete achieve their individual goals. Our athlete progression has been developed to give each athlete a clear picture of what to expect in his or her athletic development, which will in turn aid in the quest for reaching his or her maximum potential.

In short, we expect our athletes to be humble, teachable, and passionate. Our programs are based in the latest scientific research and are intended to be competitive and fun. We strive each day to create a culture where student athletes enjoy the process of growth and improvement.

We have an open-door policy, so feel free to reach out or come for a visit. Thanks for stopping by, and GO PACK!

Coach McClellan

Office: 678.305.2895 

Mission, Vision, and Goals


Mission: Help student athletes reach their maximum potential.

We have three goals to help aid in this process:
  1. We focus on the development of Christ-like character. (1 Samuel 16:7)
  2. We reduce our athletes’ risk for injury by helping them stay healthy so they are able to compete.
  3. We teach our athletes to be strong, fast, and agile.

Yes, we want our athletes to be strong and durable. But the development of speed and strength will always come second to our focus on integrity and health.

It can be challenging for athletes to aspire to “reach their full potential.” Potential is unmeasurable and, therefore, can seem unachievable. Our goal is to challenge our athletes. We want them to understand there is a path to high achievement that involves hard work. We may not know the ceiling for each individual athlete, but the focus is on growth and improvement.

Vision: Create engaging and fun training environments where athletes thrive.

We want the weight room to be a welcoming place, where every athlete – from cheerleaders to swimmers to volleyball players to football players – feel loved, cared for, and welcome. One of the greatest challenges facing strength coaches today is changing the perception of the weight room. This rings especially true for many female athletes. In the past, resistance training was primarily used to gain strength and mass. As strength and conditioning professionals, we know this is an old-school mentality. The goal of the weight room has changed, and we are now striving to build athleticism, not bulk without real purpose, in each of our students.

We want our training environments to be both challenging and fun. We want the weight room to be the catalyst for mental toughness and hard work throughout our entire athletic department, but knowing our audience is key. Our training approach with the varsity girls volleyball team will vary greatly from the varsity football team. We strive to create an engaging and positive atmosphere where both teams feel comfortable yet challenged.

WolfPack Athlete Progression


5th and 6th Grade (Introduction): Whitefield students will begin their involvement with the strength and conditioning program during this time. This will not include year-round lifting, but rather short, non-progressive phases for introduction. Light loads will be used with an emphasis on body weight exercises, mobility, and flexibility.
  • Focus: Mobility/Flexibility/Introduction to the basic lifts
  • Basic lifts: Air squat, Goblet squat, Front squat, Lunge, Hip hinge, Bench press, Shoulder press, Push-up, Band rows, and Chin-up
  • Light loads/proper technique

7th and 8th Grade (Foundation): During these years, mastery of the basic lifts should be achieved. The amount of weight lifted is of little importance, with focus and attention being directed toward technique and control. Mobility and flexibility are still heavily emphasized. The athlete will be introduced to the deadlift, overhead squat, hang clean, and Turkish getup.
  • Focus: Mobility/Flexibility/Mastery of the basic lifts
  • Basic lifts: Air squat, Goblet squat, Front squat, Lunge, Hip hinge, Bench press, Shoulder press, Push-up, Band row, and Chin-up
  • Introduction to the Back squat, Overhead squat, Deadlift, Hang clean, Push press, and Turkish getup

9th and 10th Grade (Strength): As the athlete enters Upper School, mastery of the basic lifts should have been achieved. Focus will shift to speed and strength. Progressive movements will be introduced. Weights are adjusted for athletes as needed.

Boys

  • Focus: Speed/Strength
  • Turkish getup: 50 lb.
  • Power clean: 200 lb.
  • Back squat: 1.5x body weight
  • Bench press: Body weight
  • Introduction to the Power clean, Push jerk, and Jerk

Girls

  • Focus: Speed/Strength
  • Power clean: 95 lb.
  • Back squat: Body weight
  • Bench press: 75% of body weight
  • Turkish getup: 30 lb.
  • Introduction to the Power clean, Push jerk, and Jerk

11th and 12th Grade (Advanced development): As the athlete enters the last two years of Upper School, the focus of our programming shifts to strength to body weight ratio. Any weaknesses hindering the goals below will be addressed. Weights are adjusted for athletes as needed.

Boys

  • Focus: Speed/Strength to body weight ratio/Weaknesses
  • Turkish getup: 80 lb.
  • Back squat: 2x body weight
  • Power clean: 225+
  • Bench press: 1.5x body weight
  • 40-yard dash: Skills - Below 5.1, Bigs – Below 5.6
  • 26+ vertical jump

Girls

  • Focus: Speed/Strength to body weight ratio
  • Power clean: 115+
  • Back squat: 1.25x body weight
  • Bench press: 90% of body weights
  • Turkish getup: 40 lb.
  • 40 yard dash: 6.0-
  • Vertical jump: 18+

Jonathan McClellan

Jonathan McClellan graduated from Covenant College in 2006 with a Bachelor of Science in psychology. At Covenant, he played collegiate basketball and received All-Conference honors in multiple seasons as well as scored more than 1,000 points in his four-year career. Upon graduation, he became a personal trainer for a variety of athletes in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and worked as a strength and conditioning coach for the high school wrestling program at Baylor School. In 2009, he moved to Atlanta to manage Fitness Together Norcross before launching Elite Fitness of Atlanta in 2011.

Coach McClellan has been working with the strength and conditioning program at Whitefield Academy for three years and was named head of the program in July 2016. Since 2009, he has been certified through the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA), the world’s leading authority on strength, conditioning, and fitness. The NSCA distinguishes itself from all other certifying organizations because its foundation is rooted in scientific research. Coach McClellan’s other certifications include USA weightlifting (USAW-SPL1) and TRX suspension training (L1), and he is also a member of the National High School Strength Coaches Association (NHSSCA).

Coach McClellan lives in Mableton with his beautiful wife, Lindsey. When not in the weight room, they enjoy reading, the beach, and serving at Buckhead Church.