Upper School

Core Curriculum

Biblical and Christian Studies

History: Bible and the Ancient World
This year-long freshman course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped Western civilization from the rise of the first civilizations in the Ancient Near East through the Greeks and the Romans. One full quarter of the course is devoted to reading and interpreting selections from the Old Testament in their historical and theological contexts. Students will be introduced to and engage with the core historical skills of identification, analysis, synthesis, and communication, as well as develop basic research skills. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to see how all of history is part of God’s grand narrative and how the ancient and classical worlds have shaped who we are today. (1 credit: .5 Bible, .5 History)
History: Church and Medieval
This year-long sophomore course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped western civilization from the birth of Christianity through the end of the Middle Ages. One full quarter of the course is devoted to reading and interpreting selections from the New Testament in their historical and theological contexts. Students will continue to develop core historical skills, with special emphasis given to achieving synthesis through reasoning about contextualization, causation, comparison, and continuity and change over time. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to see how who we are today rests on the successes and failures of God’s people during the first 1400 years of church history. (1 credit: .5 Bible, .5 History)
Prerequisite: History: Bible and Ancient World
Christian Thought
The purpose of this junior-year core Bible class is to train students to read the Bible deeply and accurately according to covenantal structure, genre, literary device, and recurring thematic elements in the biblical canon. As students are growing in their exegetical capability, the class also discusses the formation of core Christian doctrines as they are derived from the Scripture. The goal of the class is to lead juniors to a deep understanding of Christian thought and doctrine so that truth is understood in the context of who God is (as revealed in Jesus Christ through the biblical record) and not merely as a string of rote belief statements. The main text for the class is the English Standard Version of the Bible, but supplemental readings include Christian Beliefs by Wayne Grudem and the writings of C.S. Lewis. (1 credit)

Senior Bible
The purpose of the Senior Bible class is to continue training students to read the Bible deeply and accurately. The class focuses on the six essential worldview questions of origin, identity, sin/evil, redemption, purpose, and destiny. The students will explore how the Bible answers these questions while also exploring how the larger culture answers these questions. By looking at a variety of answers to these questions, students will be able to compare and contrast the answers of the culture around them to the answers of the Bible. The culmination of the class is an in-depth paper in which students discuss their answers to these worldview questions so as to leave for college with a clear understanding of what they believe, why they believe it, and how what they believe affects each aspect of their lives and choices. (1 Credit)

English

English 9/9H: Literature and Composition
The objective of this course is for students to further develop their skills of reading, writing, and critical thinking. Through the teaching of literature, we help the students develop their ability to acquire knowledge, understand what they know, and communicate thoughts about their understanding. Students will study the fundamental principles of sound writing – from using proper grammar in a clear, compelling sentence style to developing multiple-paragraph compositions. Our writing program for ninth graders emphasizes developing ideas by using and discussing relevant details to give vividness and specificity to what an author says. As well, ninth graders will read time-honored fiction, poetry, and drama, such as Lord of the Flies and Much Ado About Nothing.
(1 Credit)
The English Department offers an honors course for grade 9. The prerequisites are completion of 8th grade English with an average of at least 90 and their 8th grade English teacher’s recommendation. Students in honors English 9 will be expected to read fluidly and analytically, and to write clearly, with a strong foundation in mechanics and analytical argumentation. The best determining factor of success for honors students is a 90 or above in the categories of formal writing and testing from previous English courses.
English 10/10H: American Literature
Students taking this course will read works of American literature from the Colonial times into the 20th century. Essentially, the course divides into categories of study: early America, romanticism, realism, modernism, and postmodernism. We read such defining American authors as Hawthorne, Chopin, Cummings, Dickinson, Eliot, Emerson, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Frost, Hemingway, Miller, Twain, and Whitman. Students will endeavor not only to understand particular works but also to consider how those works developed American literature and both influenced and reflect American culture. While much of the time in class is devoted to the discussion of literature, students will also have ample opportunity to respond to the literature as well as other topics in writing. Teachers endeavor to help students offer supported opinions in their essays, not just convey relevant information.
(1 Credit)
The English Department offers honors courses for grades 10 and 11. The prerequisites are completion of the previous honors English class with an average of at least 88 before honors quality points are added – or an average of at least 90 in the previous standard English class – and a teacher’s recommendation, based on a student’s interest, ability, and work ethic. Particular emphasis should be placed on the student’s performance on formal papers and tests. The best determining factor of success for honors students is a 90 or above in the categories of formal writing and testing in the previous English course.
English 11/11H: British Literature
In the 11th grade students exercise and expand their reading, writing, and analytical thinking skills through the rigorous study of the canon of British literature. Reading poetry, prose, and drama, students begin this study the Anglo-Saxons and end in 20th century Britain. Notable authors studied include the poet of Beowulf, Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Bronte, Wordsworth, Blake, and Wilde. Juniors will continue to write essays that argue for an opinion and learn to engage meaningful transitions to guide the reader through an essay. Students will learn to consider the entirety of an essay – content, structure, and style – and how all work symbiotically to produce a pleasing whole assignment.
(1 Credit)
The English Department offers honors courses for grades 10 and 11. The prerequisites are completion of the previous honors English class with an average of at least 88 before honors quality points are added – or an average of at least 90 in the previous standard English class – and a teacher’s recommendation, based on a student’s interest, ability, and work ethic. Particular emphasis should be placed on the student’s performance on formal papers and tests. The best determining factor of success for honors students is a 90 or above in the categories of formal writing and testing in the previous English course.
English 12: World Literature
Following their studies of American and British literature, seniors will read a greater variety of literature, works by American, British, European, Russian, and Central American writers. The course explores how we read and interpret literary worlds, or mirrors, in an attempt to help us interpret the world in which we exist. Based on the strong foundation in American and British Literature that students have already received, this course now compares a wide variety of texts spanning different countries and time periods to compare and contrast timeless themes. Students continue to write rigorous, argumentative papers, culminating in an extended final paper that is the culmination of their study of English literature. (1 Credit) Prerequisite: Completion of prior English courses.
AP English Language and Composition/Christian Thought
An AP course in English Language and Composition engages students in becoming skilled readers of prose written in a variety of rhetorical contexts, and in becoming skilled writers who compose for a variety of purposes. Both their writing and their reading should make students aware of the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects, as well as the way genre conventions and the resources of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. This course is intended for juniors. It does not replace British Literature, but it does replace Christian Thought. The course is designed around major issues in the world today and reads a wide variety of perspectives on those issues, examining the rhetorical effectiveness of many written and oral arguments. Both secular and Christian perspectives are presented and discussed through a Christian lens. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors English 10 with a grade of 90 or higher (or successful completion of English 10 with a grade of 92 or higher), a teacher recommendation, a strong work ethic, and a commitment to growing as a writer.
English 12: AP English Literature & Composition
Following their studies of American and British literature, seniors will read a greater variety of literature, works by American, British, European, Russian, and Central American writers. The course explores how we read and interpret literary worlds, or mirrors, in an attempt to help us interpret the world in which we exist. Based on the strong foundation in American and British Literature that students have already received, this course now compares a wide variety of texts spanning different countries and time periods to compare and contrast timeless themes. Students continue to write rigorous, argumentative papers, culminating in an extended final paper that is the culmination of their study of English literature. Students will also prepare for the AP Literature exam by writing timed essays and completing rigorous multiple choice tests from past AP exams.
(1 Credit)
The English Department offers AP English Literature for advanced senior English students. The prerequisites are completion of the previous honors English class with an average of at least 88 before honors quality points are added and their teacher’s recommendation, based on a student’s interest, ability, and work ethic. The best determining factor of success for AP English Literature students is a 90 or above in the categories of formal writing and testing from previous years. In AP English literature, teachers will expect students to interact with the literature and fellow students at the college level, perform well on objective tests, and write critical papers with great ease.

Fine Arts

Orchestra 1
This is a beginning to intermediate level string class for grades 6 - 12 . Students will learn to play violin, viola, cello, harp, and bass instruments incorporating note recognition, rhythm, meter, key signatures, ear training, and bowing techniques. Students will learn basic music theory and be exposed to many styles of musical repertoire. They will perform in a variety of ensemble settings including several school performances and may play for community events. (1 Credit)
Orchestra 2
This course is a performance course for intermediate to advanced level string players in grades 7-12. Students will build upon the principles and basic skills from earlier training and they will learn more difficult music theory and more advanced playing techniques. Students will learn music from a wide variety of genres including Classical, Sacred, Irish, Bluegrass, and popular/movie themes. With a focus on building orchestral and string ensemble performance skills, this course gives students several performance opportunities throughout the year including school events as well as events within the community. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Orchestra 1 and teacher recommendation
Band 1
This course provides an introduction to brass, woodwind, and percussion performance and technique. Students begin by mastering basic rhythm, meter, note recognition, and finger placement on their desired instrument through daily exercise and instruction. Performances include solos, small ensembles, and large group experiences - all of which incorporate varied styles of beginning band instruction. (1 Credit)
Marching & Concert Band
These courses are second/third year brass, woodwind, and percussion performance classes in a standard upper school band style setting. They incorporate a fall semester of marching band and a spring semester of concert band. Students will review and build upon basic skills - adding more advanced key signatures, scales, meters, rhythms, note ranges, articulations, and styles - and will be assessed through performance and written tests to measure accomplishment of goals. Performances will include varied experiences and various genres of music that include classical and jazz styles, standard band arrangements, and a variety of level two-four literature. These courses may be repeated as an elective for credit. (.5 credit each)
Prerequisite: Band 1 and teacher recommendation
Jazz Band
This fast-paced course is for upper level band students who qualify artistically and instrumentally. Students are required to play a traditional jazz band instrument and be in the marching band. Standard and original jazz compositions are studied and performed to understand musical interpretation and technical devices employed in the jazz idiom. Students will study the history of jazz and incorporate music theory, improvisation, and listening skills. As a part of the course, students are required to perform at numerous events both on and off campus. This course may be repeated for credit as an elective. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: teacher approval
US Theater - Fall
Fall Theater is a first semester theater class open to Upper School students. The purpose of this class is to prepare for the fall musical. Students will explore contemporary musical theater through audition, research, rehearsal and performance of a musical production. This course will provide students the opportunity to explore acting exercises, costuming, choreography, makeup design, and singing in ensemble and solo settings. Students are expected to participate in all productions and rehearsals including those after school hours. Although students cast in the musical are not required to take the class, it is strongly preferred. In addition, students not cast in the musical do not take this course. A commitment to after school rehearsals is expected. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
US Theater - Spring
Students will explore contemporary theater through audition, research, rehearsal and performance of a dramatic production. This course will provide students the opportunity to explore acting exercises, costuming, and makeup design. Although students cast in the spring play are not required to take the class, it is strongly preferred that they do take the course. In addition, students not cast in the spring play should not take the course as the class focuses on preparing for the production. Students are expected to participate in all productions and rehearsals including those after school hours. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
Live Production (Fall and Spring)
This one semester course provides an introduction to technical theater and live production and engenders an appreciation and understanding of the production process. Students will explore the basics of production planning, rigging, lighting, scenic, and sound design. In class, students will focus on disciplined time management, communication, and group problem solving while assisting during assemblies, concerts, and events in the Louise Owens Theater. The goal of this course is to develop a method of understanding technical aspects of production, and discovering a language with which to express this understanding in a theatrical context Students are expected to attend rehearsals and crew calls for assigned projects to include events outside school hours. Dedication and critical thinking are a must for this course. Offered fall and spring. (.5 credit per semester)
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
NOTE: Class formerly titled "Theater Technology"
Art 1
Students will gain introductory visual art knowledge, skill, and experience with the elements of art and the principles of design while developing their God-given abilities through new challenges and multi-faceted studio assignments. Focus will center on drawing, painting, three-dimensional sculpture, ceramics, mixed media, art history, art criticism, and aesthetics in order to gain appreciation and love for the visual arts. Students evaluate their own work, the work of other students, and well-known artists from a Christian worldview in contrast to a secular worldview. Students will work on basic skill development and basic visual art concepts which will carry through and build upon each other through the course.
(1 Credit)
Exceptional work in seventh and eighth grade art (or an equivalent) and a teacher recommendation may exempt students from Art 1 and allow them to enroll in an Art 2 course in ninth grade should seats be available. Though a student can exempt Art 1 per the guidelines above, there will be no academic credit awarded on the transcript for the exemption.
Art 1: Digital Art
This year-long course allows the student to explore art, design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator), as well as Microsoft Publisher. The students will study the elements and the principles of traditional art, as well as the graphic design principles, incorporating them into their graphic design projects in the four programs. There will be discussion of marketing and branding theories. The students will create a variety of communication pieces including posters, letterheads, business cards, brochures, advertisements, cd covers, and a complete website. As an introductory Art 1 course, there will also be instruction in drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, and ceramics. (1 Credit)
Exceptional work in 7th & 8th grade art (or an equivalent) and a teacher recommendation may exempt students from Digital Art 1 and allow them to enroll in an Art 2 course in ninth grade should seats be available. Though a student can exempt Art 1 per the guidelines above, there will be no academic credit awarded on the transcript for the exemption.
Art 2: Drawing & Painting
Students will develop their God-given abilities through experiences with a variety of drawing and painting materials, styles, techniques, and subject matters. Students will deepen their understanding of the elements and principles of design and how these elements and principles relate to their work and the work of others and obtain the skills needed to evaluate their own work and the work of others as they gain greater understanding of composition, craftsmanship, and quality. Students will gain a basic understanding of art history, art criticism, and aesthetics related to drawing and painting. Students will be encouraged to push their creativity to new levels as they develop a greater appreciation of the visual arts and develop their own artistic voice. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1 and teacher recommendation
Art 2: Graphic Design
This semester course offered in fall and spring allows the student to operate as a member of a graphic design studio while exploring design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator), as well as Microsoft Publisher. The students will have the opportunity to design promotional pieces for Whitefield events with real clients and real-time deadlines. The students will study graphic design, branding, and marketing principles and their importance in today’s visual culture while gaining skills in the four programs. They will create a variety of communication pieces including posters, letterheads, business cards, brochures, advertisements, and a complete website. An overview of vector graphics while working in Illustrator on an “art for art’s sake” project and/or screenprinting a t-shirt design using an exposure unit will be the final course segment. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1, Digital Art 1, or Yearbook 1


Art 2: Advanced Graphic Design
This semester course offered in the spring allows a greater in-depth exploration of design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator, Premier Pro, After Effects), as well as instruction and experimentation with SketchUp creating 3/dimensional architecture and products, Corel Painter using a graphic tablet, creating videos in iMovie on a iPad or Premier Pro, screenprinting using an exposure unit, TinkerCad and printing on a 3/D printer, and creating video graphics in After Effects. The primary goal of this course is to expose the students to a broader range of computer and technology applications used in Graphic Design today. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Graphic Design or Digital Art 1

Art 2: Sculpture & Ceramics
In this one semester course, students will develop their God-given abilities and talents through an in-depth study in three-dimensional art through unique classroom experiences based upon the elements of art and the principles of design with a focus on ceramics, wire, carving, assemblage, relief, mixed media, and found object sculpture. Students will create both functional and decorative works of art. Students will gain a deeper knowledge of artists, processes, art criticism, and aesthetics. Students will be expected to work at an intense and skillful level to develop their own artistic style. The projects will be challenging and will require additional planning and preparation outside of class. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1 and teacher recommendation

Art 2: Advanced Sculpture & Ceramics
In this one semester course, students will experience an in-depth study in advanced three-dimensional art. Students will create both unique and advanced functional and decorative works . Students will gain a deeper knowledge of ceramics as an art form and kiln operation. Students will be expected to work at an intense and skillful manner to develop their own artistic style and excel at potter’s wheel, hand building techniques, and experimental forms. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1 and Art 2: Sculpture and Ceramics and teacher recommendation
Art 2: Photography
This one semester course is designed for students with little or no photography background as well as more advanced students. The course will cover foundational concepts of photography, including an introduction to the use of 35mm digital cameras (SLR), 35mm film cameras, and computer/digital imaging. This course concentrates on many areas of photography: technical skills, creativity, composition, basic darkroom procedures, techniques, experimentation, software, problem solving, creative expression, and the history of photography. Students will also learn about preparation of photographs for exhibition and they will participate in class critiques, individual critiques and discussions with the teacher to build understanding. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1 and/or active participation in the Photography Club and teacher recommendation.
Requirement: Digital camera (SLR preferred)
AP Studio Art (2-D Design, Drawing, 3-D Design)
Students will create works of art that are original, personal, and intriguing while furthering their appreciation for visual arts and a divine Creator. Participation in a sustained investigation of three sections of the AP Studio Art portfolio (which includes quality, breath, and concentration) will function alongside mastery in the areas of concept, composition, personal artistic voice, and execution of ideas in the chosen portfolio through studio experiences. Students develop a 2-D design portfolio utilizing a variety of concepts, approaches, techniques, and medium as well as assembling a body of work with a strong underlying visual idea. Critical thinking and problem solving will assist students in making informed decisions in their personal artistic journey and in honing the skill of critiquing the work of others. The foundation of this course is building upon previous knowledge of the elements and principles of design -and acquiring new knowledge and understanding of various concepts and approaches in order to create a portfolio. Students enrolled in this course are required to complete the AP Studio Art portfolio exam. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1 and Art 2 and teacher recommendation

Foreign Language

French I
This course will construct a basic foundation of French grammar concepts, vocabulary, and cultural awareness. Students will learn communication skills by actively participating in class as well as utilizing various textbooks, the workbook, and listening activities. Through this course, students will build confidence in speaking French and developing an appreciation for French culture. (1 Credit)
French II
This course builds upon the goal of improving oral and written skills while at the same time deepening the student’s knowledge of French culture. The focus of this class is oral communication (listening comprehension and production) as well as improved reading and writing proficiency in French. Grammatical structures are presented formally for references but are always integrated in functional situations relating to communication. Throughout the year, focus is placed on developing longer, more complex conversational exchanges and writing samples using past tense. In addition, students read selected authentic and abridged texts-both for information and pleasure, and to supplement their cultural knowledge through targeted Internet activities, video clips, and movies. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: French I
French III
This course offers additional opportunities for expanding the silos of language learning: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Students initiate and maintain face-to-face communication in French by identifying main ideas and significant details in discussions, presentations, written texts, and interpretation of authentic materials. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: French I and French II
Honors French IV
Honors French IV is designed for students who have successfully completed French III and wish to further their knowledge of the French language. The course is taught almost exclusively in French. The course emphasizes conversational and grammatical skills at an advanced level. Students focus on the verbal and auditory aspects in a range of settings and situations for a variety of purposes. Cultural literacy and appreciation of French and Francophone culture is incorporated into the course work by sampling French fiction, literary works of art, recordings, films, newspapers, magazines, creative writing, reading for information and pleasure, and discussion. Particular attention to the teaching of language skills (listening, reading, speaking, and writing) is instructed through the study of advanced oral and written texts. The course is instructed exclusively in French. Students can expect extensive work in grammar, pronunciation, idioms, structure, and analysis. The assessment combines grammar, compositions, and audio recordings. Students will be exposed to practice tests from the SAT II, the National French Contest, and AP French. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: French III with a grade of 90; teacher recommendation
AP French
This course emphasizes the use of French for active communication. Music, video, and print will be used to enhance linguistic skills and an understanding of the culture of Francophone countries. The course is comparable in difficulty and content to a third year college course. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP French exam. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: successful completion of French I, II, III; a grade of at least B+ in Honors French IV; teacher recommendation
Latin I
In this course students will develop the ability to comprehend simple written Latin texts based on a variety of topics. Because of the focus on comprehension, Latin differs from the primary goal of the modern languages. Latin I focuses on interpretation of texts rather than on person-to-person communication. To support the development of the students’ reading skills, students learn to use Latin orally, to understand oral Latin, and to write simple phrases and sentences. Students also learn about perspectives, practices, and products of the ancient Romans as reflected in aspects of their daily lives. Students compare these cultural and historical elements to their own culture and recognize examples of the influence of Greco-Roman civilization in their own world. Through the students’ understanding of the structures of Latin language and vocabulary, students enhance their understanding of these same linguistic elements in English. (1 Credit)
Latin II
In this course students refine Latin reading skills and continue to strengthen English reading and vocabulary skills through vocabulary building and structure analysis. Through the reading selections and class discussions, students acquire a more in-depth knowledge about the daily lives and history of the Romans and continue to make comparisons relevant to today’s society. Furthermore, the students also compare effects of the geography of the ancient Roman world and that of the United States on aspects of culture - such as food, dwellings, clothing and the arts. Intermediate and advanced writing tasks also build a bridge to understanding the written word. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Latin I
Latin III
All skills developed in Latin I and Latin II are applied in this course. Major emphasis is placed upon continuing and advancing communication in the four skill areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students enhance their writing skills, review and master previously acquired grammatical skills, and increase the quantity and application of vocabulary. A main focus of this course will be the construction and usage of the subjective mood. Readings will include cultural topics designed to reinforce important unit themes, as well as excerpts from Latin literature. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Latin II
Honors Latin IV
Students in Honors Latin IV will continue to complete grammatical constructions while deepening their knowledge of vocabulary and inflectional systems. Furthermore, they will demonstrate more advanced comprehension skills and continue to read original Latin passages. They will also continue to interpret and analyze both adapted and original passages orally and in writing. They will analyze the significance of the historical figures, the geographical features and the development of the Roman government as they expand their knowledge of the Greco-Roman world. They will make inferences and draw conclusions about the ways the ancients thought and acted and about the influence of Latin and Greco-Roman civilization on their own language and culture. Finally, they will extend their exploration and research of the Greco-Roman world to the global community. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Latin III
AP Latin
The AP Latin course is designed to give students the experiences needed to be successful on the College Board AP Latin exam. The course’s goals are to develop the students’ abilities to translate literally the required passages from Caesar’s De bello Gallico and Vergil’s Aeneid into English, to help them understand the context of the written passage (including the political, historical, literary, and cultural background of each author and text), and to help them understand the reasons behind the particular style of writing and the rhetorical devices employed. The course should also help students to be successful in analyzing Latin passages to understand how and why the author uses the language in a particular way and the effects he is hoping to produce. Students will learn to analyze the text and draw their own logical conclusions. This course should give students tools to read Latin prose and poetry aloud with accurate comprehension and appreciation. For the Vergil text, students will learn dactylic hexameter and how it is used to enhance the text and create effect, and students will scan the poetry at least once a week. Students will be required to sit for the AP Latin exam in May. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Honors Latin IV
Spanish I
This course introduces studetns to the Spanish language and its culture. Students learn and perform the most basic functions of the language, including appropriate and correct use of vocabulary, expressions and grammar structures. Students engage in role play, dialogue, cooperative learning, reading, writing, and audio-visual activities that encourage immersion as they participate in language acquisition. (1 Credit)
Spanish II
This course continues to enable students to develop the skills of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Spanish. Students are introduced to new grammatical concepts, vocabulary, and cultural information. The foreign language experience is enhanced with the application of new concepts in daily oral and written practice. Students expand their understanding of the similarities and differences in the Spanish language. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Spanish I
Spanish III
This course builds upon all skills developed in Spanish I and Spanish II. Major emphasis is placed upon continual and advanced communication in the four skill areas of speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will continue to enhance their writing skills; review and master previously acquired grammatical skills; and increase the quantity and application of vocabulary. Readings will include cultural topics designed to reinforce important unit themes as well as excerpts from Spanish literature. Classes are taught in an immersion manner – almost exclusively in the Spanish language. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Spanish II
Honors Spanish IV
Honors Spanish IV is designed to emphasize the use of language for active communication. The successful student will develop an Intermediate-Mid to Intermediate-High proficiency in the language (according to the ACTFL guidelines) by engaging in a variety of communicative activities that focus on developing listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Through discussion of current events, listening to radio programs and songs, and viewing videos and films, students will enhance their language skills and their ability to engage in spontaneous conversation with native speakers. This course is conducted entirely in the target language and it is comparable in difficulty and content to an intermediate level college class. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish III with a grade of B+; teacher recommendation

AP Spanish
Spanish AP stresses oral skills and composition. Various media such as music, video, and newspapers will be used to enhance the linguistic skills as well as the culture of the Spanish speaking countries. The successful student will develop an Advance-Low to Advance-Mid proficiency in the language (according to the ACTFL guidelines). This course is comparable in difficulty and content to an advanced level (5th- and 6th-semester or the equivalent) college Spanish language course. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP exam. Upon successful completion of the AP Spanish exam (3 or higher on a 5-point scale), students may receive college credit and advanced placement. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Honors Spanish IV with a grade of B+; teacher recommendation

History

History: Bible and the Ancient World
This year-long freshman course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped Western civilization from the rise of the first civilizations in the Ancient Near East through the Greeks and the Romans. One full quarter of the course is devoted to reading and interpreting selections from the Old Testament in their historical and theological contexts. Students will be introduced to and engage with the core historical skills of identification, analysis, synthesis, and communication, as well as develop basic research skills. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to see how all of history is part of God’s grand narrative and how the ancient and classical worlds have shaped who we are today. (1 credit: .5 Bible, .5 History)

History: Church and Medieval
This year-long sophomore course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped western civilization from the birth of Christianity through the end of the Middle Ages. One full quarter of the course is devoted to reading and interpreting selections from the New Testament in their historical and theological contexts. Students will continue to develop core historical skills, with special emphasis given to achieving synthesis through reasoning about contextualization, causation, comparison, and continuity and change over time. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to see how who we are today rests on the successes and failures of God’s people during the first 1400 years of church history. (1 credit: .5 Bible, .5 History)
Prerequisite: History: Bible and Ancient World
Modern European History
This year-long junior course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped European history from the early modern period through the 20th century. This course includes a global focus insofar as students will also study European interactions with the rest of the world, including the discovery and colonization of the Americas and imperialism in Africa and Asia. Students will grow their core historical skills, specifically focusing on reading and analyzing primary sources in order to connect the details to the deeper themes of history. Throughout this course, students will consider the implications of the development of nationalism, individualism, and secularism from a Christian worldview. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: History: Church and Medieval
AP European History
This year-long junior course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that shaped European history from the early modern period through the 20th century. Students will examine major themes of political, intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and economic history. Students will grow their core historical skills, with significant focus on reading and analyzing difficult primary and secondary sources in order to connect the details to the deeper themes of history while considering all developments from the perspective of a Christian worldview. Students enrolled in this class are required to take the AP European History exam. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP World History or successful completion of History: Church and Medieval with a B+ or higher, an approved PreACT/PSAT score, and a teacher recommendation.
U.S. History
This year-long senior course introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that have shaped American history from 1491 to the present. Beyond the political narrative that provides the essential structure of the course, students will also explore the development of social, economic, and religious ideas that have contributed to the formation of a distinctively American identity. Students will continue to refine core historical skills, with special focus on the ability to synthesize and communicate their knowledge of the past and how it impacts the present. Throughout this course, students will be challenged to think critically about Christian responses to various aspects, past and present, of American political, social, and economic life and about how followers of Christ should engage as citizens in a post-Christian nation. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Modern European History
AP U.S. History
This rigorous senior-year AP class introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that have shaped American history from 1491 to the present. Beyond the political narrative that provides the essential structure of the course, students will also explore the development of social, economic, and religious ideas that have contributed to the formation of a distinctively American identity, while considering all developments from the perspective of a Christian worldview. In preparation for college humanities courses, students will draw on their core historical skills to take ownership of their own learning as emerging historians, with significant attention given to reading, analyzing, and synthesizing large amounts of more advanced historical texts through both formal writing and in-class discussion. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP U.S. History exam. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of AP European History or successful completion of Modern European History with a B+ or higher, an approved PSAT score, and a teacher recommendation.
AP World History
This challenging elective AP class introduces students to significant events, dates, individuals, developments, and processes that have shaped world history from the earliest river valley civilizations through the major states of the 20th century. The successful student will master the major themes and key concepts across political, intellectual, social, religious, cultural, and economic history, while considering all developments from the perspective of a Christian worldview. Students will benefit from an accelerated approach to developing core historical skills, with significant attention given to improving students’ writing skills through both formal and in-class writing assignments. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP World History exam. (1 elective credit)
Prerequisite: Successful completion of History: Bible and Ancient World with an A- or higher (specifically in the areas of writing and reading comprehension), an approved PreACT score, a strong work ethic, and a teacher recommendation.

Math

Algebra 1
The primary objective of this course is the understanding and application of fundamental algebraic concepts. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, linear functions, systems of linear equations, exponential and quadratic equations, and polynomial factoring. Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphical, algebraic, numeric, and verbal representations of relations and to use those representations to solve problems. (1 Credit)
Geometry
The primary objective of this course is the understanding and application of fundamental geometric concepts. Topics include inductive and deductive reasoning, coordinate geometry, polygon and circle properties, similarity, the Pythagorean Theorem, area, and volume. Students will be challenged to apply reasoning skills to draw mathematical conclusions in a logical and systematic manner. The development of visual thinking skills is another unifying component of this course. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Algebra 1
Honors Geometry
The primary objective of this challenging course is to complete a study of fundamental geometric concepts and applications. Topics include inductive and deductive reasoning, classical construction, coordinate geometry, polygon and circle properties, area and volume, the Pythagorean Theorem, and similarity. A particular emphasis is placed on using deductive reasoning, with formal geometric proofs emphasized throughout the course. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 1 and teacher recommendation
Algebra 2
The purpose of this course is to complete a further study of the abstract algebraic concepts introduced in Algebra 1. Significant time is spent investigating the important implications of a function. Topics include linear and quadratic functions, polynomials, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational functions, conics, and basic trigonometry. Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphical, algebraic, numeric, and verbal representations to solve problems while mastering the fundamental concepts of algebra. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Geometry
Honors Algebra 2
The purpose of this advanced course is to complete a further study of the abstract algebraic concepts introduced in Honors Algebra 1. Significant time is spent investigating the important implications of a function. Advanced topics include the complex number system, analytic geometry, exponential and logarithmic functions, and triangle trigonometry. Students will be expected to describe and translate among graphical, algebraic, numeric, and verbal representations to solve problems while mastering the fundamental concepts of algebra. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Honors Geometry and teacher recommendation
Algebra 3/Trigonometry
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for future success in college-level mathematics. This goal is accomplished through the further study of algebraic concepts and applications introduced in Algebra 1 and 2. Linear, polynomial, rational, logarithmic, and exponential functions are explored analytically as well as using a graphing utility. The course concludes with a broad overview of fundamental trigonometric concepts. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Algebra 2
Pre-Calculus
The primary objective of this course is to prepare students for success in college-level mathematics. This goal is accomplished through an intensive study of functions and their applications, beginning with a review of linear and quadratic functions before moving to more advanced topics. Polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions are thoroughly explored analytically as well as using a graphing utility. The course concludes with a brief overview of fundamental calculus concepts. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Algebra 3/Trigonometry or Algebra 2 with a grade of 87 or higher
Honors Pre-Calculus
The primary objective of this course is preparation for success in college-level mathematics. This goal is accomplished through an intensive study of functions and their applications, beginning with a review of linear and quadratic functions before moving to more advanced topics. Polynomial, rational, logarithmic, exponential, and trigonometric functions are thoroughly explored analytically and by using a graphing calculator. Other topics that will be examined include systems of equations, sequences and series, analytical trigonometry, polar coordinates, and limits. The course concludes with a brief overview of fundamental calculus concepts.
Prerequisite: Honors Algebra 2 and teacher recommendation (1 Credit)
Honors Calculus
The primary objective of this course is to complete a study of fundamental calculus concepts and applications. Topics include functions, limits, differentiation, integration, and applications of derivatives and integrals. A multi-representational approach will be used throughout the course as topics will be presented verbally, graphically, numerically, and analytically. Students will be challenged to think critically by applying concepts to a wide range of problems. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus
AP Calculus AB
This is an Advanced Placement course which, theoretically, is equivalent to one semester of college calculus. This course is designed to present all major concepts and applications of limits, derivatives, and integrals in a single variable form. Each of these calculus topics will be taught from a multi-representational approach. Topics will be presented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The student will be expected to work with each topic from all of these perspectives. There will also be a heavy emphasis on integrating technology into this subject. Students will be challenged to use higher order thinking skills in a wide range of problems by applying known concepts. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Calculus AB exam. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus, an approved PSAT score, and teacher recommendation
AP Calculus BC
This course is designed to present all major concepts and applications of single variable calculus which includes limits, derivatives, integrals, and infinite series. Each of the topics will be taught from the multi-representational approach. Topics will be presented geometrically, numerically, analytically, and verbally. The student will be expected to work with each topic from all of these perspectives. A heavy emphasis on technology integration will be a part of this course. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Calculus BC exam and must be concurrently enrolled in BC Lab during a Free Period. (1 Credit, Lab earns .5 credit)
Prerequisite: Honors Pre-Calculus, an approved PSAT score, and teacher recommendation
AP Statistics
The purpose of this Advanced Placement course is to complete an introductory study of fundamental statistical concepts. Topics include data production, data analysis, probability and simulation, and statistical inference. The use of technology to facilitate inquiry and the importance of written communication to convey understanding are emphasized throughout. Students are required to take the AP Statistics exam at the conclusion of this course. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus with a grade of B+ or higher, an approved PSAT score, and teacher recommendation OR Honors Geometry with a grade of A and teacher recommendation

Physical Education

Health & Physical Education
In Health and Physical Education classes, students participate in speed, agility, and strength training, learn about life-long fitness habits, and focus on making choices that will develop a healthy lifestyle. Elements of team and individual sports, cardiovascular fitness, and fitness testing are also included. Students earn the ADAP certificate necessary for the Georgia driver's permit. (1 credit)

Science

Biology and Honors Biology
This freshman-year course is designed to provide a broad presentation of the diversity of life on earth, the structures and processes necessary for life, the physical commonalities among organisms, and the relationships among living things. Topics will include the structure and function of the cell, genetics, plant structure and function, major systems of animal life, and ecology. Students will apply this knowledge in the contexts of laboratory experiments, reports, tests and class discussion. The order and detail of God’s creation will be highlighted throughout the year. (1 credit)
Prerequisite for Honors Biology: teacher recommendation
Chemistry and Honors Chemistry
This sophomore-year course aims to enhance student appreciation and knowledge of the foundational principles of chemistry. The course will focus on the structure of matter, reactions between substances, and the measurement of chemical systems. Students will apply this knowledge in the context of laboratory experiments, reports, tests and class discussion. Through the study of chemistry students discover the building blocks of God’s creation and learn how God put these building blocks together in an orderly fashion to create a beautiful world of living and nonliving things. (1 credit)
Prerequisite for Chemistry: completion of Biology
Prerequisite for Honors Chemistry: successful completion of Honors Biology and teacher recommendation; success in Honors Geometry and placement in Honors Algebra 2 are strongly preferred.

Physics and Honors Physics
This junior-year course is designed to introduce students to the foundational principles of physics through laboratory activities, textbook readings, and class discussions. Laboratory activities will emphasize careful data collection and analysis. Students will investigate mechanics, heat, wave motion, electricity and magnetism. They will demonstrate their understanding of these concepts through lab reports, tests and class discussions. Throughout the year, the order and harmony of God’s creation will be highlighted. (1 credit)
Prerequisite for Physics: completion of Geometry and concurrent enrollment in Algebra 2
Prerequisite for Honors Physics: successful completion of Honors Algebra 2 or A average in on-level Algebra 2 and concurrent enrollment in Pre-Calculus
Anatomy & Physiology
This year-long, senior-year science elective course focuses on human anatomy semester 1 and human physiology semester 2. Semester 1 takes an in-depth look into the structure and function of the human body as the organ systems are broken down, discussed, and dissected. Students will gain knowledge of the body’s organs as well as the roles of bones and muscles as they work together to create movement. Students will do an in-depth study of the nervous system and its role in regulating the body. Semester 2 focuses on body systems that work to maintain the internal equilibrium necessary for life. Topics include the endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems as well as metabolism, nutrition, acid-base balance, and fluid and electrolyte balance. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: Biology and Chemistry


AP Chemistry
This course is designed to be the equivalent to a general chemistry course taken during the first year of college. It focuses on the basic structures of matter, the foundational interactions between substances, and the energy changes involved in physical and chemical processes. The course includes a strong laboratory component through which students will develop skills using glassware and instruments as well as collecting and analyzing real-life data. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Chemistry exam. (1 Credit)
Prerequisite: Chemistry, Algebra II, an approved PSAT score, and teacher recommendation
AP Biology
This senior-year course is a college equivalent survey course designed to give students a broad understanding of the basic structures and processes that make life possible and the relationships among living things and their respective environments. Regular laboratory investigations will be incorporated to enhance the understanding of topics, to improve students’ laboratory skills, and to allow students to practice collecting and analyzing experimental data. The topics studied will provide basic information that can be combined with biblical perspective to tackle difficult issues, such as human cloning and stem cell research. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Biology exam and must be concurrently enrolled in a Lab during a Free Period. (course, 1 credit; lab, .5 credit)
Prerequisite: Biology, Chemistry, Physics, an approved PSAT score, and teacher recommendation
AP Physics C: Mechanics
This senior-year course (designed to be equivalent to a freshman-level college physics course) will survey the foundational principles of mechanics. Topics will include Newton’s Laws of Motion, rotational and circular motion, energy, momentum, gravitation and simple harmonic motion. Students will investigate these topics through laboratory experiments, class discussion and textbook readings. The student will learn to evaluate a variety of problems using the laws of physics, calculus and data analysis. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the AP Physics C exam. (1 credit)
Prerequisites: Successful completion of Pre-Calculus or Honors Pre-Calculus, concurrent enrollment in AP Calculus AB or higher, and teacher recommendation

Technology

Art 1: Digital Art
This year-long course allows the student to explore art, design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator), as well as Microsoft Publisher. The students will study the elements and the principles of traditional art, as well as the graphic design principles, incorporating them into their graphic design projects in the four programs. There will be discussion of marketing and branding theories. The students will create a variety of communication pieces including posters, letterheads, business cards, brochures, advertisements, cd covers, and a complete website. As an introductory Art 1 course, there will also be instruction in drawing, painting, photography, sculpture, and ceramics. (1 Credit)
Exceptional work in seventh and eighth grade art (or an equivalent) and a teacher recommendation may exempt students from Digital Art 1 and allow them to enroll in an Art 2 course in ninth grade should seats be available. Though a student can exempt Art 1 per the guidelines above, there will be no academic credit awarded on the transcript for the exemption.
Art 2: Graphic Design
This semester course offered in fall and spring allows the student to operate as a member of a graphic design studio while exploring design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator), as well as Microsoft Publisher. The students will have the opportunity to design promotional pieces for Whitefield events with real clients and real-time deadlines. The students will study graphic design, branding, and marketing principles and their importance in today’s visual culture while gaining skills in the four programs. They will create a variety of communication pieces including posters, letterheads, business cards, brochures, advertisements, and a complete website. An overview of vector graphics while working in Illustrator on an “art for art’s sake” project and/or screenprinting a t-shirt design using an exposure unit will be the final course segment. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Art 1, Digital Art 1, or Yearbook 1

Art 2: Advanced Graphic Design
This semester course offered in the spring allows a greater in-depth exploration of design and communication through the Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, and Illustrator, Premier Pro, After Effects), as well as instruction and experimentation with SketchUp creating 3/dimensional architecture and products, Corel Painter using a graphic tablet, creating videos in iMovie on a iPad or Premier Pro, screenprinting using an exposure unit, TinkerCad and printing on a 3/D printer, and creating video graphics in After Effects. The primary goal of this course is to expose the students to a broader range of computer and technology applications used in Graphic Design today. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Graphic Design or Digital Art 1

Live Production (Fall and Spring)
This one semester course provides an introduction to technical theater and live production and engenders an appreciation and understanding of the production process. Students will explore the basics of production planning, rigging, lighting, scenic, and sound design. In class, students will focus on disciplined time management, communication, and group problem solving while assisting during assemblies, concerts, and events in the Louise Owens Theater. The goal of this course is to develop a method of understanding technical aspects of production, and discovering a language with which to express this understanding in a theatrical context Students are expected to attend rehearsals and crew calls for assigned projects to include events outside school hours. Dedication and critical thinking are a must for this course. Offered fall and spring. (.5 credit per semester)
Prerequisite: Teacher recommendation
NOTE: Class formerly titled "Theater Technology"
Computer Science
The primary objective of this fall semester course is to complete a study of basic computer science concepts through the use of Alice, a 3D visual programming tool. Alice allows students to readily learn fundamental programming constructs through the creation and animation of engaging virtual worlds. The responsible use of computers is stressed throughout the course. (.5 credit)
Prerequisite: Geometry
AP Computer Science A
The purpose of this Advanced Placement course is to complete an introductory study of computer science in preparation for the AP exam to be held in May. By taking an object-oriented approach to programming using the Java language, the course places particular emphasis upon the appropriate design and development of computer programs to solve problems. Fundamental computer science concepts such as the implementation of algorithms and the use of data structures are investigated. Basic hardware and software principles as well as the responsible use of computers are important components of this college-level course. Students are required to take the AP Computer Science A exam at the conclusion of this course. (1 credit)
Prerequisite: teacher recommendation

Graduation Requirements

Graduation Requirements Units
English 4
Mathematics 4
Science 4
History and Social Sciences 3
Foreign Language 3
Biblical and Christian Studies 3
Fine Arts 1
Health and Physical Education 1
Electives 2

  • Mathematics credits must include Algebra 1, Geometry, and Algebra 2.
  • Science credits must include Biology, Chemistry, and Physics.
  • History and Social Science credits must include European History and US History.
  • Foreign Language credits must all be from the same foreign language.
  • Biblical and Christian Studies graduation requirements can be adjusted for students transferring to Whitefield Academy without any prior Bible courses.
  • The Fine Arts credit must be in addition to the 2 Electives credit requirement.
  • Any overages in core curriculum graduation requirements can count towards the 2 Electives credit requirement.